5 Things I Don’t Do With My Preschoolers

5 Things I Don’t Do With My Preschoolers

 

Today, I’m going to share 5 formal lessons that I refuse to teach my preschoolers. Some may shock you, but don’t worry. My kids still know their numbers, letters, colors, and shapes. Really, truly, they do. And I didn’t have to spend hours searching for the right printables to teach them, either. *smirk*

5 Things I Don’t Do With My Preschoolers

1. Letters.

Don’t misunderstand me. We do cover letters. But I don’t dedicate an entire week to each letter. I don’t even print out letter pages for them to work.

2. Numbers

Again, we learn numbers. We count. We add. But again, I don’t print out pages upon pages going over one number or one concept. Call me lazy, but I’m not gonna do it!

3. Worksheets

Now, we do have some workbooks, but I don’t bring them out often. Instead of relying on them, we use worksheets as review.

4. Formal Lessons Before Age 6

This depends on the child, but for the most part, we do not do formal lessons before age 6. What that means is that I don’t sit my preschoolers down and expect for them to do work at a desk. If one of my children asks me to teach them something, I will. But even then, I avoid curriculum.

5. Cut Out All Tv

I know. Shocker. But seriously, there are so many educational shows on TV. And even the shows that aren’t educational usually teach social skills and how to follow a story.

5 Things I DO With My Preschoolers

Instead of focusing on one letter at a time, we read books that have all of the letters. We talk about the letters as interest arises, and we play games that include finding certain letters. We also talk about what sounds they make. The key here is that I talk with my preschoolers about them as we go, not at a certain time.

Just like with letters, I don’t teach numbers at a specific time. I’m amazed at what my preschoolers have learned with me by counting common objects around the house. We also practice counting trees, leaves, seeds, and flowers. Sometimes we practice adding them or even subtracting amounts. This practical application has worked much better for my preschoolers than any workbook or worksheet could.

While we don’t use worksheets or workbooks as a rule, we do use them as review. My preschoolers do not learn from them, but we do reinforce ideas this way. And hey, we save a ton on paper!

Instead of formal lessons, we do informal lessons with my preschoolers. We still learn about the world around us, mostly through stores, games, and conversations. But we don’t complete a checklist. The goal is relationships, not checking boxes.

We do watch TV. Some may even say too much TV. But here’s the catch: most of it is educational TV. Even when the shows aren’t educational, I often watch my kids acting out their favorite scenes and stories. What are they building? Memories. And isn’t that the goal? Lasting relationships?

Today, I'm going to share 5 formal lessons that I refuse to teach my preschoolers. Some may shock you, but don't worry. My kids still know their numbers, letters, colors, and shapes. Really, truly, they do. And I didn't have to spend hours searching for the right printables to teach them, either. *smirk*

Summary

I’m not bashing curriculum choices here. I realize that what works for me would not work for many moms. And that’s okay. Curriculum guides do not help me, they hinder the relationships in my home. Instead, I have worked to find the rhythms that work for us. Maybe you’re looking for a change in your home…or maybe you’re just looking to form relationships with your kids and you’re happy with your curriculum. Either way, consider signing up for emails from me as I share how to include daily rhythms into your family’s life.

What do you do with your preschoolers that’s different from the norm? I’d love to hear about it!

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2 thoughts on “5 Things I Don’t Do With My Preschoolers”

  • Great post! When my daughter was preschool age, I did not spend weeks going over individual letters and numbers either. A lot of our time was spent reading and being outside. During our reading sessions, we did go over letters and sounds a little. Now that my daughter just turned six, she is already picking out words and reading simple books.

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